Do You Like Bizarre Things? Read On

bizarre things

Our First Bizzare Thing

I guess it’s obvious what it is, a Trabant. A bizarrely decorated Trabant. What really makes this bizarre though, is, why bother?

The Trabant was made in East Germany, before the Berlin Wall came down, from 1957 to 1990 by the VEB Sachsenring Automobilwerke Zwickau. The Trabant has the reputation of being very cheaply made and being extremely unreliable.

So again, why bother? It is bound to die and spares are likely impossible to obtain.

Then there are the bizarre rock formations. How about this one that looks like a Camel to me. Or how about the Dolphin below from Corsica?

weird rocks

Don’t see it? Maybe it’s just me being weird.

A Bizarre Collection

The Skull Museum of Hallstatt in Austria has to be one of the most bizarre things you will ever see. It’s not the collection of some sadistic sod and his disciples.

bizarre skulls

Commonly know as The Bone House, it is one of Hallstatt’s treasures. Collections such as this used to be a lot more common than now.

Anthropologist’s love them as they are able to study the development of the cranium. There are records in the museum that can be matched to each skull giving the birth and death of each one.

This museum is located in the basement of the chapel of the Church Of Saint Michael and hold 700 skulls.

Today Is Meteor Watch Day

meteor day

Today Is Meteor Day

On meteor day take the time out to look up at our beautiful Milky Way.

 

Meteors are more common than you might think. Our skies are constantly being bombarded with debris from asteroids. Some are quite large lumps of

meteor day

rubbish, but chances are the meteor, or shooting star, that you see will be, at best, the size of a pea but more likely the size of a grain of sand!

Oddly, there is not much meteor activity in June anywhere in the sky.

 

July sees an active meteor shower: July 27-28, 2018 Delta Aquariids ,visible in both the Southern Hemisphere and the Northern Hemisphere.

 

The maximum rate can reach 15-20 meteors per hour in a dark sky. You will probably need to get out of the city to see them as light pollution is an astronomers enemy, along with rain, clouds etc, etc.